Labor Day in Honor to Christ

Labor Day is a wonderful holiday to celebrate the end of summer activities, prepare for the new schedules that autumn and school bring, and get one last day of the warm sun. But as we reflect on the nature of our labor, and how to take a day off from work, we want to take even these thoughts captive to the Lord (2 Corinthians 10:5). How do you think about Labor Day, and how does Jesus fit into your plan to enjoy this holiday? May the following articles encourage and challenge you to put Christ first!

The Power of Deep Rest

photo credit drdunckley.com

photo credit drdunckley.com


There is a constant tension to balance our labor with our rest. Dominion and sabbath. Work and play. Both of these were created by God as good in the Garden of Eden. The Lord commanded Adam to work the ground and keep it (Genesis 2:15ff) and also to rest on the Sabbath, as He Himself had rested on the seventh day. How do we take a day off on Labor Day? And what does Christ have to do with our understanding of work & rest?

“But the relationship between work and rest operates at a deeper level as well. All of us are haunted by the work under the work—that need to prove and save ourselves, to gain a sense of worth and identity. But if we can experience gospel-rest in our hearts, if we can be free from the need to earn our salvation through our work, we will have a deep reservoir of refreshment that continually rejuvenates us, restores our perspective, and renews our passion.

To understand this deep rest we need to look at the biblical meaning of the Sabbath—to understand what it is a sign of, and what it points to.”

Continue reading “The Power of Deep Rest” at The Gospel Coalition

The Hope of Imperfect Moms

photo credit Verge network

photo credit Verge network


Everyone knows that moms LABOR hard. Everyone knows moms face uphill challenges. But how do imperfect moms (which we all are) face up to an impossible task and perfect heavenly Father?

I just want them to go to bed so I can have some peace and quiet.

But they kept delaying what I wanted. My anger rose and the yelling soon followed.
“I said get in bed now!”
“Do not say another single word and brush your teeth!”
“If you can’t find your blanket by the count of 10, then you will sleep without it!”

Finally, I was tucking them into their beds. As I did, I saw the hurt and sadness in their eyes and the tears of my youngest. But, at the moment, I didn’t care. I was free. I marched downstairs and sat myself on the couch, relieved to finally be done with bedtime. To be done with a day of mothering. To do whatever I wanted.

But as I sat there, the conviction slowly crept in and the weight of shame began to fill my chest. I examined my behavior – my outburst of anger, the shouting, the threats – and saw the root of it all: I want this freedom because I honestly think it will satisfy me . . . and they are getting in the way.

Continue reading “The Hope of Imperfect Moms” at Verge Network

Even If You Labor For Nothing

photo credit Desiring God
“All of us can become oppressed that our work is of no value. Any one of us can be crushed by the feeling that others do not approve of how we do our work. Who has never felt the pang that he has labored in vain and spent his strength for nothing? When discouragement comes in this form, we need a special weapon to fight the fight of faith…

“Our reward is measured not according to “our success” but “our labor” and, as with our blessed Master, vouchsafed even in the failure of our ministration.

“‘I have labored in vain, I have spent my strength for nothing and vanity, yet surely my right is with the LORD and my recompense with my God.’ (Isaiah 49:4)

“That verse pierced my heart like a shot of spiritual adrenaline.” Continue reading “Even If You Labor For Nothing” at Desiring God

About blund

Brian J. Lund is minister of Word & Sacrament at Zion Evangelical & Reformed Church. You can follow him at his website or @BrianJLund.
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